"Salus populi suprema lex est" Cicero, de Legibus

Commerce Dept Releases Steel and Aluminum Report

While mainstream media is fawning all over Gary Cohn and Wall Street sheds crocodile tears for his resignation, the Commerce Department released its Sec. 232 reports on Steel and Aluminum.  The underlying issue is national security which in this case means maintaining sufficient industrial capability right here in America to support our defense and the needs of our advanced industrial economy.  Fairly easy concept to get except for the media-entertainment world and a bevy of ill informed politicians on Capitol Hill.  

Key Findings in the two reports:

Key Findings of the Steel Report:

  • The United States is the world’s largest importer of steel. Our imports are nearly four times our exports.
  • Six basic oxygen furnaces and four electric furnaces have closed since 2000 and employment has dropped by 35% since 1998.
  • World steelmaking capacity is 2.4 billion metric tons, up 127% from 2000, while steel demand grew at a slower rate.
  • The recent global excess capacity is 700 million tons, almost 7 times the annual total of U.S. steel consumption. China is by far the largest producer and exporter of steel, and the largest source of excess steel capacity. Their excess capacity alone exceeds the total U.S. steel-making capacity.
  • On an average month, China produces nearly as much steel as the U.S. does in a year. For certain types of steel, such as for electrical transformers, only one U.S. producer remains.
  • As of February 15, 2018, the U.S. had 169 antidumping and countervailing duty orders in place on steel, of which 29 are against China, and there are 25 ongoing investigations.

Key Findings of the Aluminum Report:

  • Aluminum imports have risen to 90% of total demand for primary aluminum, up from 66% in 2012.
  • From 2013 to 2016 aluminum industry employment fell by 58%, 6 smelters shut down, and only two of the remaining 5 smelters are operating at capacity, even though demand has grown considerably.
  • At today’s reduced military spending, military consumption of aluminum is a small percentage of total consumption and therefore is insufficient by itself to preserve the viability of the smelters. For example, there is only one remaining U.S. producer of the high-quality aluminum alloy needed for military aerospace. Infrastructure, which is necessary for our economic security, is a major use of aluminum.
  • The Commerce Department has recently brought trade cases to try to address the dumping of aluminum. As of February 15, 2018, the U.S. had two antidumping and countervailing duty orders in place on aluminum, both against China, and there are four ongoing investigations against China.

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